Professional Assistance of a Lawyer

Litigators practice in several areas of law and their scope extends from appeals to all forms of legal documentation. These professionals selectively handle cases that involve bankruptcy, criminal defense, personal injury, business law, family law, estate planning / probate, debt collection, real estate, environmental and workers compensation. Most litigators are highly qualified professionals, who have years of experience. However, litigators strictly represent plaintiffs in courts, hearings, and trials. At the moment, attorneys also give consultation to their patrons, if they need a second opinion. A lawyer for specific cases is the most difficult part.

Attorneys specialize in cases of a certain nature. This is how people can select the right professional for the job. Generally, all attorneys and lawyers have the knowledge of other areas of law, so the consultation takes place, only with specialists that handle them. One of the best ways to find a specialized attorney is to ask for recommendations. Your friends and colleagues can recommend appropriate lawyers. Individuals, who seek help from attorneys, can also look at private law firms. These institutions have been around for a while and they come with excellent benefits and a number of highly qualified attorneys.

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On ‘rights’ And Lawyer Advertising

New Jersey Lawyers Can’t Use Judicial Testimonials in Ads

The proposed rules limiting ads do not prohibit advertising fees, but do require the lawyer to charge the client the advertised fee or a lesser fee. Clarke claims to be against censorship, but she is willing to allow the censoring of ”misleading” or deceptive ads. It sounds suspiciously as if the only censorship she is against is any that might dry up advertising revenue. The kind of lawyer advertising we are debating eventually may create a situation where the best advertisers and marketing people (aided by persons such as Clarke), as opposed to the best lawyers, will be handling the cases. With regard to bodily injury claims, this may result in such lawyers becoming mere ”settlement brokers,” to the detriment of their clients. As a lawyer, I believe that the public should use its common sense on this issue, and should not be deceived by misleading labels (”anti-censorship”) or vague, misleading claims (it ”conveys legal rights”).
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1989-07-31/news/8907282527_1_lawyer-advertising-advertising-attorneys-censorship

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TV and print ads are forbidden from “creating suspense, scenes containing exaggerations or situations calling for legal services,” according to the rules. “Citizens often choose lawyers based solely on their advertisements,” said Justice James Hardesty, who helped get the new rules passed. “Because choosing a lawyer can be such an important decision, we want our citizens to have accurate and complete information,” Hardesty said. In one commercial, Lerner cut checks to clients as a soccer announcer screamed “GOAL!” In another, he spun like a human tornado, generating cash for his clients. One new rule prohibits lawyers from creating an unjustified expectation about the outcome of a case. If a law firm advertises that it has obtained certain verdicts, for example, it must be able to provide proof. Golightly runs a television ad flanked by uniformed law enforcement agents from the North Las Vegas Police Department and the Nevada Highway Patrol.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/attorney-advertising-rules-okd-justices

New York lawyer advertising rules declared unconstitutional

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Stringer , a personal injury and wrongful death lawyer from Tampa. Why should you hire him? Because hes on a billboard . No, really. Thats his entire pitch. Call me.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://abovethelaw.com/2011/12/adventures-in-lawyer-advertising-best-lawyer-billboard-ever/

Adventures in Lawyer Advertising: Best Lawyer Billboard Ever

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The New Jersey Supreme Court implemented the guideline in 2012 after a New Jersey judge raised concerns that his statements in a non-published judicial opinion were quoted on a law firm website. The excerpt from the opinion stated: The inescapable conclusion is . . . that plaintiffs achieved a spectacular result when the file was in the hands of Mr. Dwyer . . .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/new-jersey-lawyers-cant-use-judicial-te-00890/

Battles Over Lawyer Advertising Divide the Bar

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“The New York rules went too far in imposing burdensome restrictions on legal free speech that do not protect consumers,” said Greg Beck, an attorney for Public Citizen who litigated the case. “The court rightly recognized that the First Amendment prevents states from arbitrarily restricting advertising just because some may find it distasteful.” In todays ruling, the court held that the advertising at issue in the case was a form of speech protected by the First Amendment, and it categorically rejected New Yorks argument that advertising considered by the state to be trivial or irrelevant was not covered by free speech rights. It noted that the state had not produced any evidence that its restrictions on speech were necessary to protect consumers and found that the prohibitions were much broader than necessary to accomplish the states claimed objectives. Public Citizen also challenged the rules application to non-commercial speech, such as offers by lawyers to represent clients without a fee in civil rights cases. And in what amounted to another victory for free speech, the court construed the challenged amendments not to apply to nonprofit attorneys. “The main beneficiaries of this decision are New York consumers,” Beck said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://kevin.lexblog.com/2007/07/23/new-york-lawyer-advertising-rules-declared-unconstitutional/

Attorney advertising rules OK’d by justices

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It is one of many such battles being waged around the country as the old-line leaders of disciplinary boards and state bar associations from Florida and Nevada to Iowa and New York try to rein in their more freewheeling colleagues. Depending on one’s perspective, they are part of a last-ditch struggle for the soul of the legal profession, or a crass conflict for economic advantage by the old-boys’ club, waged at the expense of free speech principles. ”Lawyer advertising adversely affects the respect the public has for the judicial system and the administration of justice,” said Richard Ransom, the retired chief justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court who spearheaded the adoption of tough advertising rules in 1992. Victor Marshall, who is representing Mr. Bell in his Federal suit against the board, which ruled that some of Mr. Bell’s ads could be misleading, countered: ”The rules are unconstitutional as written and even more so as applied. Members of the public have seen his ads five hundred million times without ever claiming that they were misled. The only people who actually complained are other lawyers.” A changing and even contradictory patchwork of state regulations governs lawyer advertising, but since the 1977 Bates v.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nytimes.com/1997/07/19/us/battles-over-lawyer-advertising-divide-the-bar.html

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How To Build The Visual Foundation Of Your Case

How to Build the Visual Foundation of Your Case
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We all know by now that we live in a world in which information is delivered visually, and that people learn best when they have visual aids. Attorneys who head to court with demonstratives to show as well as tell their case are at a distinct advantage over attorneys who lack graphics that make their oral and written presentation more understandable and engaging. The question for trial attorneys is, how best can you create visuals for a powerful case presentation—especially if your time and budget are limited?
Last week, I answered that question and showed a three-step plan for creating simple yet effective graphics at a presentation for the Melvin Belli seminar on trial practices, hosted by the Santa Clara County Trial Lawyers Association. This blog post will summarize some of my key points and show a few images as examples. This presentation focused on PI cases, since most of the attorneys in attendance specialized in personal injury, but the steps below can apply to almost any type of case.
The expression of legal issues in a visual manner is open to endless creative possibilities, with the primary goal being to impart information and enhance understanding. Let’s take a look at ways you can make some basic graphics for a typical case involving an incident with injury. My plan involves (1) what to do before depositions, (2) what to do before mediation, and (3) what to do before trial. Each step builds on the prior work done and results in powerful, admissible demonstratives for trial.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/how-to-build-the-visual-foundation-of-yo-51763/

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Simplify And Emphasize In Litigation Graphics

Simplify and Emphasize in Litigation Graphics
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In oral argument, a litigator has very limited time—she needs to hit the
high points and move on. She must communicate enough information
to convince the judge or jury of her argument, yet must avoid getting
mired in details that will only confuse.
Good litigation graphics can counter this time crunch by allowing an
attorney to communicate clearly and quickly. The adage “a picture is
worth a thousand words” reflects the truth that our brains quickly process and understand images.
To support an argument, graphics should be tightly tied to the key points of the advocate’s message. At Cogent Legal, we start the design of a litigation graphic by understanding the messages the litigator wants to convey. Our experience as trial attorneys often helps in this process—we understand legal briefing and can work with our clients to transform written arguments into oral and visual presentation. Often, we help the attorneys simplify their arguments and hone in on the most important points.
Today’s blog post reviews this design process for a hypothetical animation of a chemical
synthesis for defendant’s opening argument in a patent infringement case (the case is based on a real case, but in this hypothetical, we have changed some details to protect the identity of the parties and the confidential information in that case).
The starting point for a litigation graphic is the message that it needs to convey. In our
hypothetical case, the patent covered a pharmaceutical compound delivered in tablets. Our hypothetical client wanted to prove that the compound could be synthesized by following the procedure described in an article published years before the filing of the patent
application (i.e., the article was “prior art”). This proof, that the pharmaceutical compound could be made by following the procedure in the prior art article, would make the patent invalid.
The evidence was that an expert had twice performed the synthesis described in the prior art article. In the first run, the expert had added a reactant rapidly, and had achieved a yield of 7% for the desired pharmaceutical compound. On the second run, the expert added the reactant slowly over 30 minutes (slow addition of reactants is a well-known technique to increase the yield of a synthesis). This second run resulted in a yield of 76% of the desired pharmaceutical compound.
The briefing and expert report contained many details about the two performances of
the synthesis described in the prior art article (e.g., 250 milliliters of solution, 45 degrees
centigrade, filtration and extraction procedures, etc.). In working with our client, we decided to simplify the argument by omitting much of this detail. Our client wanted to emphasize two key points in the argument:
• both syntheses (rapid or drop-by-drop addition) created the patented pharmaceutical
compound; and
• a simple change of adding the reactant by drops over half an hour increased the yield of the compound.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/simplify-and-emphasize-in-litigation-gra-54003/

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